In the words of Jocelyn O.

 

I wanted to talk about the piano recital that happened April 22nd, 2012. I also want to add that in future piano teaching related blog posts I will be reviewing piano books I own and use. 
I think as part of my piano teaching experiences I should include the books I use to teach or simply review any books I’ve used/own etc. One of my goals is to own a copy of every piano related book out there: methods, scales, repertoire, etc. And since I am achieving it little by little I thought it’d be great to review a book at a time. It can be frustrating to search for a review for a book online and turn up with barely information or nothing at all on it. I’d like to contribute to changing that as much as possible.

I should probably do this in some sort of order. Perhaps review all the Michael Aarons I own or Schaums. I will see how I go about this.

So the recital.

It was a great success for the most part. This 3rd recital (the 1st was August 7 (maybe) 2011 & 2nd was December 11 or 18, 2011) was the first to be held outside of the Academy’s location. It was held at a lovely church, which happens to be where my manager from Job 1 (bookstore) works at, and it was a nice change of scenery.

I was worried at first because my husband pointed out, on the stage, there was no piano, but a keyboard. A small, unweighted keys keyboard…. I freaked. We had been told there would be a piano. After a bit of polite insisting on my bosses part and with the help of 4 men – hubby included 🙂 – the upright, and not perfectly tuned, piano was carried on stage. We made the most of it because it was a piano and that was all that mattered at that point.

A total of 15 of my students performed amongst guitar and voice students.

I arranged them mostly from youngest to oldest. The first of my students was an autistic 12 year boy who is teaching me SO much. He did a great job and I was very proud of him. Besides patience he’s teaching me that I need to get out of my comfort zone to teach. You really can’t settle into a one routine works for all mentality – and this applies for all children. My oldest student, which performed last, was great. I was also extremely proud of her because she is an adult who works, has a husband and child, and because of her job must travel a lot, yet amidst all the ruckus she perseveres in learning the piano. Everyone in between was great.

Some of them forgot what I try to instill in my students: If you make a mistake while performing, don’t stop, keep playing till the end because hardly anyone will notice. Where as if you stop and make it obvious more people will be aware of the error.

I don’t want to make the post too long, but I think it’s interesting to ponder the notion of how we could apply that idea I instill in my students:

“If you make a mistake while performing, don’t stop, keep playing till the end because hardly anyone will notice. Where as if you stop and make it obvious more people will be aware of the error.”

What do you think?

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